The Bed
bedthe_tkt.jpg
Showing In
5@5 Golden Years
Sequoia 2Fri, Oct 6 4:45 PM
“Look at that sky, life's begun. Nights are warm and the days are young.” Come celebrate the history of MVFF in this marvelous retrospective of rarely screened short films. You know Barry Jenkins from his Moonlight (MVFF 2016) triumph, but he first came to MVFF with My Josephine (US 2003, 9 min), a paean to cultural integration and love in a laundromat. Filmmaking legend Agnès Varda has had a long history with MVFF (including this year’s Faces, Places) and her documentary Oncle Yanco (US/France 1967, 18 min) is a tribute to her Sausalito-based artist relative and also a love poem to Marin. And we’re proud to showcase a brand-new 16mm restoration of the avant-garde classic The Bed (US 1968, 20 min), shot on Mt. Tamalpais by James Broughton, one of the honorees at the first MVFF in 1978. Don’t miss it!
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5@5 Golden Years
Rafael 3Thu, Oct 12 9:30 PM
“Look at that sky, life's begun. Nights are warm and the days are young.” Come celebrate the history of MVFF in this marvelous retrospective of rarely screened short films. You know Barry Jenkins from his Moonlight (MVFF 2016) triumph, but he first came to MVFF with My Josephine (US 2003, 9 min), a paean to cultural integration and love in a laundromat. Filmmaking legend Agnès Varda has had a long history with MVFF (including this year’s Faces, Places) and her documentary Oncle Yanco (US/France 1967, 18 min) is a tribute to her Sausalito-based artist relative and also a love poem to Marin. And we’re proud to showcase a brand-new 16mm restoration of the avant-garde classic The Bed (US 1968, 20 min), shot on Mt. Tamalpais by James Broughton, one of the honorees at the first MVFF in 1978. Don’t miss it!
View More Not Available
 
Film Info
Year:1968
Running Time:20 min.
Description
We’re proud to showcase a brand-new 16mm restoration of the avant-garde classic The Bed , shot on Mt. Tamalpais by James Broughton, one of the honorees at the first MVFF in 1978.
Additional Information
James Broughton was born in Modesto in 1913 and taught film and ritual at San Francisco State University and the San Francisco Art Institute. In the late 1960s, his irreverent and sexually liberating works won him a large following, especially in the Bay Area. Alan Watts crowned him the "unofficial poet laureate of San Francisco." Broughton married Joel Singer in 1976 and they collaborated on many films and books of poetry until Broughton's death in 1999. Broughton made The Bed fifty years ago during the Summer of Love.