The Other Side of Hope (Toivon tuolla puolen)

Showings

Rafael 2 Fri, Oct 13, 2017 6:00 PM
Sequoia 1 Sat, Oct 14, 2017 5:30 PM
Film Info
Category:Focus: Hiding & Seeking
Section:World Cinema
Country:Finland
Year:2017
Running Time:100 min.
Language:Finnish
English
Swedish
Arabic
Director:Aki Kaurismäki
Producer:Aki Kaurismäki
Screenwriter:Aki Kaurismäki
Cinematographer:Timo Salminen
Editor:Samu Heikkilä
Samu Heikkilä
Samu Heikkilä
Samu Heikkilä
Cast:Sherwan Haji
Sakari Kuosmanen
Print Source:SPUTNIK OY with BUFO
THE FINNISH FILM FOUNDATION
YLE COPRODUCTIONS
PANDORA FILM
ZDF/ARTE
FINLAND 100 PROGRAMME and THE CHURCH MEDIA FOUNDATION
Note Writer:David Fear

Description

FOCUS: HIDING & SEEKING Khaled (Sherwan Haji) is a Syrian refugee seeking asylum in Helsinki. Wikström (Sakari Kuosmanen) is a salesman who parlays after-hours poker winnings into buying a restaurant. Their worlds collide when the entrepreneur finds the immigrant living behind his dumpster (“This is my room.” “This is my garbage field.”) and offers the man a job. Local authorities and nationalist goons, however, want Khaled gone. It will take a village—or in this case, savvy coworkers—to save him. Finnish cinema maestro Aki Kaurismäki returns with another gloriously deadpan story of down-and-outers, but like his 2011 poetic-realism riff Le Havre, the writer/director’s latest laces its hipster humor with a strong dash of humanity. Filled with Middle Eastern folk-to-rockabilly musical interludes and longtime collaborator’s Timo Salminen’s colorful cinematography, The Other Side of Hope uses Kaurismäki’s iconic too-cool-for-school comedy to smuggle in a compassionate, torn-from-today’s headlines fable of community.

Additional Information


Aki Kaurisma¨ki, born in 1957, grew up in “the age terrorized by television,” and has tried and managed to stick to the inseparable realities of the real world and the "deep screen" that only 35 mm film—light against electronic machinations, the beauty of artisanal tradition against technological overkill—makes possible. He has never used any other material, least of all video, and is very proud for having continued the tradition of “real cinema.” His minimalist style is all his own (and that of the great cinematographer of all his films, Timo Salminen); he never entered the Finnish Film School (as he was suspected to be "too cynical"). At the same time, his films are full of allusions, but always invisible ones, parts of a constant dialogue wherein particles of film culture reveal realities of human environment, society and psyche: as it is now, and as it was during the tender years of Aki's childhood.