Generation War (Unsere Mutter, unsere Vater)
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Showings
Sequoia 2Sun, Oct 6, 2013 5:00 PM
This screening includes all 3 chapters of the Generation War series
Not Available
 
Rafael 3Mon, Oct 7, 2013 12:30 PM
This screening is part 1 in the Generation War series
AT RUSH. Tickets may be made available at showtime
 
Rafael 3Tue, Oct 8, 2013 12:30 PM
This screening is part 2 in the Generation War series
AT RUSH. Tickets may be made available at showtime
 
Rafael 3Wed, Oct 9, 2013 12:30 PM
This screening is part 3 in the Generation War series
AT RUSH. Tickets may be made available at showtime
 
Film Info
Section:World Cinema
Country:Germany
Year:2013
Running Time:270
Language:German
Director:Philipp Kadelbach
Producer:Nico Hofmann
Screenwriter:Stefan Kolditz
Cinematographer:David Slama
Editor:Bernd Schlegel
Cast:Volker Bruch
Tom Schilling
Katharina Schüttler
Ludwig Trepte
Miriam Stein
Christiane Paul
Print Source:Music Box Films
Description
North American Premiere

In German with English subtitles. Valor, courage and betrayal come to the fore in this powerful German epic, which shows the everyday realities of wartime life from the perspective of ordinary Germans. Five childhood friends from Berlin say their goodbyes in June 1941, promising to reunite by Christmas. Generation War spans the cold tundra of the Russian front to the interior dialogues about moral compromises of life under Hitler. In Germany, it sparked a heated discussion in the media over personal responsibility and the burden of guilt of everyday people for Nazi atrocities. Exquisitely shot, this compelling work reveals a country still trying to understand how their people could have let themselves become so tragically misdirected.

—Daniela Province



PRESENTED IN ASSOCIATION WITH BERLIN & BEYOND FILM FESTIVAL AND SF JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL, AND GERMAN CONSULATE GENERAL
Additional Information

The film project Generation War fascinated me from the moment I read the complex and thought-provoking script by Stefan Kolditz. Five lives, five paths that begin together, diverge, then cross each other again. Something we’ve allegedly seen very often, on the big screen or on TV, but hopefully never before as is shown here. Very close to the characters, seen subjectively from the perspective of the five young people who belong to the generation of victims and perpetrators of that time. The individual approach resulting from this – the question as to whether one can allow an intimacy with the characters – was, for me, one of the central questions in the adaptation.